Archive for category Dubstep

Brostep

Brostep is a term coined in America as the new manifestation of Dubstep over in America.  The term brostep has been used by some as a pejorative descriptor for a style of popular Americanised Dubstep. Dubstep purists have levelled criticism at Brostep because of its preoccupation with “hard” and aggressive sounding timbres.  U.S. and Canadian artists often drew inspiration from British producers who tended to work less with sub-bass and more with mid-range sounds such as Rusko and Vex’d.  Rusko himself has claimed in an interview on BBC Radio 1Xtra that “Brostep is sort of my fault, but now I’ve started to hate it in a way… It’s like someone screaming in your face for an hour… you don’t want that.”

Brostep has the similar beat patters as Dubstep, but with less usage of the sub-bass and much more usage of heavily processed mid-bass and synths to produce a very “thick” sound.  Usage of sine waves to give the “computer speak” noises is also very popular in Brostep.

Brostep has very little in ways of Dubstep influences, no Jamaican or Caribbean roots, and in some Dubstep producers minds has turned its back on its roots – which is always a sure sign of the genre not being around for long.

 

 

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Dubstep

Dubstep originates from London as an organic merging of Drum n Bass, Garage and Dub.  Originally as experimental B-sides of 2-step garage, but gained commercial momentum when the sound was championed by John Peel on BBC Radio 1 from 2003-2004.  Artists such as Photek, Wordsound Germany, Plasticman and Loefah were early pioneers of the genre, exploring how Dubstep can be presented.

Dubsteps format is syncopated with a large use of tuplets and shuffled rhythms, averaging to about 140BPM.  The signature of Dub – that being the hard and strong snare/clap is ever present in Dubstep, but with far less reverb usually.  Dubstep has a very dark and minor vibe, usually with minimal vocals, and if there are, usually spoken or rapped.

The most famous part of Dubstep is the bassline.  Due to the slow bass and snare hits, there is a lot of room in between for creativity in the bassline dubbed the “Wobble”  This is a bassline, usually a saw or sine being put through an oscillator and various other filters to give it a grimy and dark timbre.

Towards the end of the 2000s Dubstep was receiving worldwide play, and becoming endemic in pop songs.  With artists like Britney Spears, Rihanna and Snoop Dogg releasing singles and albums with a heavy Dubstep influence.  The height of Dubstep in its original form would be at the end of the 2000s with artists such as Magnetic Man, Nero and Skrillex.  The latter artists have sinced redevloped its sound and their signature productions are no longer considered Dubstep – in a severe pigeon holing context and is explored in Post-dubstep, Brostep and other sub genres.

 

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